Korean War I.D.P.F.’s: How to Access Korean War Casualty Records from the National Archives

 

The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty file is a vital tool for researching individual Korean War veteran’s who were killed in action or who died in the service during the Korean War. In this post we will examine why the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record is important for Korean War research, what kinds of records you can expect to find in your veteran’s casualty record, and how you can access your veteran’s I.D.P.F. casualty record.

 

The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records, which are housed at the National Archives, contain original paperwork detailing the death and burial of Korean War veterans who became casualties during the Korean War. The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record is especially important because almost 90 percent of all Korean War military service records were lost in the 1973 archives fire. The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records can actually help us to reconstruct the circumstances surrounding the death and burial of the individual KIA veteran- even when the service records were lost in the 1973 archives fire. The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record can be used in conjunction with many other alternate record groups housed at the archives to ensure that the story of the individual Korean War veteran who became a casualty can be preserved. In this post we are going to examine the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record in more detail so that you can gain a better understanding of exactly what to expect when you request your Korean War veteran’s I.D.P.F. casualty record. As you become more familiar with Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records I think you will agree that it is a must-have for researching veterans who became casualties during the war.

 

Why is the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record so important? The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record can help researchers to better understand exactly what happened to a veteran of the Korean War who was killed in action. There are numerous records inside of the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record which detail how the Korean War veteran was killed, the disposition and burial of the veteran’s remains, and the unit to which the Korean War veteran was assigned during combat. In many instances, the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records also contain correspondence to and from the deceased veteran’s family after the Korean veteran became a casualty. The letters from members of the deceased veteran’s family can provide insight into not just what happened to the veteran but also into the story of how the death impacted the veteran’s family as a whole. In addition to the correspondence that can often be found in the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty file, there are many other records (beneficiary paperwork for example) which can provide a wealth of information for genealogical researchers trying to find out more about their family history. Let’s take a closer look at some of the types of original documents that can be found inside the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record. At the end of this post I will also provide some recommendations on how you can access your Korean War veteran’s Korean War I.D.P.F. Casualty File.

 

Korea War I.D.P.F. casualty record -report of death. The report of death will provide a basic overview of when and where the veteran was killed in action. This example provides us information not only on the date or death, arm of service and rank of the veteran, but also information on the next of kin of the deceased veteran.

 

report of death from IDPF Korea

 

Korean War I.D.P.F. cause of death reports. Some Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records also contain records detailing an investigation into the cause of death. In this instance the veteran’s remains were recovered from a collapsed bunker in Korea, and the recovery as well as the identification of his remains were documented and placed inside the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record.

 

 

 

Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records eye-witness accounts. In some instances there are witness accounts placed in the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record to help document how the veteran was killed and/or the process to identify and  recover the remains of a deceased Korean War veteran.

 

Korean IDPF witness statement

 

Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record internment reports. The report of internment is another important document which is found in the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record. The report of internment shows how the Korean War veteran was killed in action, unit to which he was assigned and also details personal effects found on the veteran when the body was located.

 

Korea IDPF report of internment

 

In certain cases where the identity of the Korean War veteran was in question the fingerprints and dental records would have been examined as a way to be certain that the remains of the deceased Korean War veteran were properly identified.

 

 

Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record medical documents. If your Korean War veteran was treated or examined at an aid station during the war there may be additional medical reports placed in the I.D.P.F. casualty record. In this particular instance the veteran was evacuated to a medical treatment station, but was pronounced dead upon arrival. You can see the medical diagnosis indicates that this veteran died as the result of shrapnel fragment wounds.

 

cause of death Korean War IDPF

 

Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record personal effects documents. Documents listing the personal effects which were in the Korean War veteran’s possession at the time they were killed in action can provide a unique glimpse into the past. These records can show us, for example, what the veteran was reading, writing, or collecting as souvenirs at the time when they passed away.

 

Korean War inventory of effects

 

Correspondence. The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record may also include correspondence to and from the veteran’s family, as well as letters pertaining to the disposition of the veteran’s remains from government agencies or funeral homes. These records can be incredibly useful for researching one’s family history. Even letters from those outside of the veteran’s family can sometimes provide clues about what was happening within the family itself.

 

 

The correspondence located within the Korean War I.D.P.F. may also include documentation tracing the return of the veteran’s remains to the United States, among other burial documents.

 

 

While this post has featured some different kinds of records that may be found inside the Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record, there are simply too many different kinds of reports for me to cover each type of document you might find in your veteran’s casualty file. Your veteran’s experiences will be unique to him or him, and that means that they only way to find out what is in your veteran’s Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty file is to order your veteran’s Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record from the National Archives.

How to obtain a Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record from the National Archives.  The Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty records are maintained at the National Archives. The fastest and most convenient way to access your veteran’s I.D.P.F. is to use a well known and reputable research company. When you use a reputable research company ( Golden Arrow Military Research for example) it ensures that you will receive high quality digital scans- such as those we have featured in this  article- within just days. By contrast, you may have to wait months just to receive the lower quality photocopies from the government.  A reputable research agency will have research specialist who are physically on-site at the National Archives where they digitally scan the Korean War I.D.P.F.’s, page by page so that you can see the documents and artifacts within your veteran’s I.D.P.F.  exactly as they appear in their original form.  If you are interested in obtaining a Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record from the National Archives you can request your veteran’s I.D.P.F. here: Request a Korean War I.D.P.F. casualty record from the National Archives.

Or you can request your veteran’s I.D.P.F. directly from Golden Arrow using our request form:

Your name:
Your email:
Veteran's name:
Branch of service:
Veteran's date of death:
Veteran's serial number:

Happy hunting!

Author: Geoff

Geoff Gentilini is the lead researcher at Golden Arrow Research. He specializes in the research of military service records from all branches of the U.S. Military. For help obtaining military service records you can fill out a request form here: Research a Military Service Record

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